An Aries birthday party.

img_5956Today marks the 99th birthday of the founding father of ICP. To celebrate, we are sharing some photographs and a astrological reading of our favorite Aries. These are photographs discovered in the past year processing his archives.

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Aries (The Ram) is the first astrological sign in the zodiac and the first sign of the spring, are characterized as full of life, passionate, enthusiastic but always like to be first.

Aries are adventurous and courageous, always determined to accept challenges. Because of their autonomy, the Aries is a born leader.

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The weakness of the Aries is their tendency towards impatience when not faced with a challenging situation, this can also lead to thoughtless or impulsive behavior.

 

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At the end of the day, the Aries are cheerful and the combination of all of their traits make them very cute and loyal to friends new and old.

Happy Birthday, Cornie! The next one will be a big one!

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Happy birthday to Yofi Capa

One of my greatest joys processing the Cornell Capa papers, is coming across a picture of Cornell’s dog, Yofi. Yofi was beloved by Capa and Edie and is very often mentioned in their correspondence, friends and colleagues both asking after and wishing the pup well.

In a card from photographer Yvonne Kalmus, addressed March 29th, 1969 he writes: “Sabra’s First Day In U.S. Yofi – 3/29-69 “Cornell_Capa_Papers-Yofi-003

This note also was enclosed with two photographs by Yvonne of a very young Yofi puppy.

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Perhaps not his exact birthday, but we celebrate 48 years of you today, Yofi!

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What six of the saw. . . Part four

 

Cornell_Capa_Papers-Burroughs-005“What six of them saw” is a project from 1971 produced by the International fund for Concerned Photography. The original idea of the project was for the young photographers to work on something that they were “into”, some facet of life to investigate during their summer holidays. The age of the participants ranges from 13 to 25; they came from all over the country and their projects were extremely varied and an intriguing.

 

Robert J. Burroughs from San Diego, California from the WSTS – What Six of Them Saw project from 1971. His project began on the 4th July . . .”I will put on a pack with everything I need to survive (minus food) and stick out my thumb on interstate 5 and go wherever the cars take me. I will carry my cameras and all the Tri-X I can get my hands on and photograph the people I meet and the ones I get rides with and the places I stay and what I do. I will come back, develop the film and print the pictures if they are successful.”  Thus began “A Hitch-Hiking nomad’s Impression of his Native Land” a project that didn’t always go to plan according to the correspondence between Robert and Cornell and Robert was not entirely happy with the result. However, looking at these images today I feel that it really does capture something of this time.

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What six of them saw. . .part three

Chester Higgins, Jr 

cornell_capa_papers-higgins_jr-003.jpg“What six of them saw” is a project from 1971 produced by the International fund for Concerned Photography. The original idea of the project was for the young photographers to work on something that they were “into”, some facet of life to investigate during their summer holidays. The age of the participants ranges from 13 to 25; they came from all over the country and their projects were extremely varied and an intriguing.

Chester Higgins, Jr  was a recent graduate in Business Management from Tuskegee Institute in Alabama and these are his posts from the WSTS – What Six of Them Saw project from 1971. Chester had already published a 96 page photo essay in 1970 called “Black Woman” (McCall Publishing Company) and he was already an extremely professional and competent photographer at this point, published in many magazines including LIFE, even though he was still under 25 years old [meeting the criteria for the WSTS project].  Chester was working on his “Black Children” book for this summer project. His mother was an elementary school teacher in Alabama and he was very much deeply connected to this local community. His photographs are simply beautiful.

 

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What six of them saw. . . part two

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“What six of them saw” is a project from 1971 produced by the International fund for Concerned Photography. The original idea of the project was for the young photographers to work on something that they were “into”, some facet of life to investigate during their summer holidays. The age of the participants ranges from 13 to 25; they came from all over the country and their projects were extremely varied and an intriguing.

https://icplibrary.wordpress.com/2017/03/16/what-six-of-them-saw/

Arthur Sirdofsky was a New York City native and his work from the WSTS – What Six of Them Saw project from 1971 was “A Community Project with Apache Indians”.  It was a profound project about social change in a community that had already suffered virtual genocide, re-organization and now possible termination.  Arthur traveled into the different reservations of the Blackfoot, Ute and Whiteriver Apache and engaged with the radical movements of Indian youth like “Red Power”.  Extraordinary images

Long ago this was their summer. This was their 1971. 

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What six of them saw. . .

 

“What six of them saw” is a project from 1971 produced by the International fund for Concerned Photography and was funded by ‘modest grants’ and the financial support of the PR Company Ruder and Finn (David Finn was closely connected to the Fund and he was on the original board of the ICP in 1974). The original objective of the project was for the young photographers [Cary Wolinsky, David Coleman, Lucinda Fleeson, Chester Higgins, Jr ,  Robert J. Burroughs, Arthur Sirdofsky and Mark Strimbu]  to work on something that they were “into”, some facet of life to investigate during their summer holidays. For these six “young American photographers of varied cultural, geographic and racial backgrounds” this was a great summer of photographic exploration.

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The projects created by the “What six of them saw” group are filled with such enthusiasm and energy it is almost contagious. In the end the project was expanded to include twenty photographers. What these amazing young photographers chose to share with us about their summers was really remarkable. For me, to find these projects, which have been patiently sitting in boxes, in Cornell Capa’s Papers, for over 40 years, was truly wonderful.

What was it that made these projects so important, interesting and unique? The age of the participants ranges from 13 to 25; they came from as distant points as Marblehead, Massachusetts to San Diego, California. Their subjects range from “Conservation and Pollution”, “the Black Child”, “Summer Camp for Spastic Children”, “A Community Project with Apache Indians”, “A Hitch-Hiking nomad’s Impression of his Native Land”, “A Peurto Rican’s Search for His Own Identity”, “A Look at the Lives of a Commune’s Children” and “A Girl-Photographer’s Glorious Summer”, soaking up everything, living and working fully and creatively.  These are projects that provide such deep insight into the time in which they were created and simultaneously they highlight the beautiful timelessness and energy of youth.

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These young person’s back in time had such great awareness and concern for the world around them and for the people that they shared the world with. Their cameras explored and examined subject and material with clinical keenness. They are filled with the optimism and beauty of youth.

Long ago this was their summer. This was their 1971.

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While the project is incomplete (the archive presently does not include the work of each of the twenty photographers, nor their essays and correspondences with Cornell Capa) as it stands the project is outstanding, and a gift to come across. Nothing is ever really a complete totality in the world of archives. What we get to see all these years later is a little snapshot of a slice of time, perfectly capturing idiosyncrasies, unique impulses, and the creative space made possible by the International Fund for Concerned Photography.

Over the next few days I will be sharing some of the images from respective summer projects of some of the participating photographers. Included in this post are photographs by Cary Wolinsky.

The photographer Cary Wolinsky at the time was a recent graduate of the photojournalism program at Boston University. Cary had made a proposal to carry out two projects: One on the atmosphere and the people to be found along route one, and another project on old carnivals. In the end Cary left America altogether and he spent his summer in Ireland with Tinkers*  Cary’s summer with Irish travelers in 1971 produced a truly profound body of work. The work includes both incredible black and white images and some beautiful  kodachrome slides.

* Tinkers or Irish travelers – aka, Pavee, Minceir or in Irish Lucht Siúil, meaning literally “the walking people” they are technically not Romanies (gypsies) but there are connections between these two distinct ethnic groups.

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JAARS, The Wycliffe Bible Translators and Cornell Capa

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JAARS (Jungle Aviations And Radio Service) Pamphlet, ca. 1970s

Cornell Capa kept a long standing relationship with the Missionary group, The Wycliffe Bible Translators. Cornell traveled with this group while working with author Elisabeth Elliot for the 1961 book Savage My Kinsman, shooting for Cornell and Huxley’s 1964 photo book Farewell to Eden and Who Brought the Word (1963), a book published by the Wycliffe Bible Translators explaining their missionary and linguistic work with tribesmen.

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In 1972 Capa resumed his project with the Wycliffe Bible Translators with an updated version of Who Brought the Word titled, Language and Faith. In Language and Faith, the Wycliffe Bible Translators focus on the work they have been doing in Papua New Guinea and the JAARS program.

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JAARS pamphlet, Ca. 1970s

“JUNGLE AVIATION AND RADIO SERVICE, a department of the Wycliffe Bible Translators, was formed in 1947 in order to meet more adequately the needs of translators in remote areas of the world.

By 1960 it was apparent that a home base was need to provide adequate training for personnel, dependable preparation of materials and rapid coordination of the total program. A tract of land located south of Waxhaw, NC was chosen as a suitable area for a base. A gift of 256.4 acres by a local business man and the leasing of approximately 200 additional acres provided sufficient land. This has proven to be an excellent choice because of its central eastern location, its proximity to important distribution centers and its excellent radio reception. Center facilities border the 330 ft. runway with accompanying hangar and shops. Other buildings include shipping and purchasing, telephone equipment, administration, communications, maintenance, private homes, duplex and a mobile home park.” — Wings for Wycliffe, pamphlet c. 1970s

While Capa was capturing the images for Language and Faith, he created some amazing shots of a JAARS helicoptor arriving at a villiage located in Papua New Guinea, and the reaction of the pilots and tribes people.

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